Alzheimer Society Cupcake Challenge

CUPCAKE

We raised a fabulous £327.23 supporting the Alzheimer’s Society Cupcake challenge on the 15th June (which just proves what I always knew … we love our buns!!).

Let’s take a minute to just look and salivate at these treats!!!

 

We will also be submitting an application to the Tony Rampton Trust in the hope this amount will be doubled.

We could not have done this without the Bakers and Donaters, and to our own Julie Walch who chivied and organised this event.  This is a cause very dear to Julie as she lost her own mother to this awful disease, and what became very apparent during the 2 hours of the bake sale was just how many people here at FGH have been affected by the devastation that Alzheimer/dementia causes.

I came back to my desk after the sale was done and the last crumbs devoured and googled the recent statistics published by the Alzheimer society (2016) –  what I found was quite sobering:

What is dementia?

Dementia describes different brain disorders that trigger a loss of brain function. These conditions are all usually progressive and eventually severe.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia, affecting 62 per cent of those diagnosed.

Other types of dementia include; vascular dementia affecting 17 per cent of those diagnosed, mixed dementia affecting 10 per cent of those diagnosed.

Symptoms of dementia include memory loss, confusion and problems with speech and understanding. Dementia is a terminal condition.

Who is affected?

There are 850,000 people with dementia in the UK, with numbers set to rise to over 1 million by 2025. This will soar to 2 million by 2051.

225,000 will develop dementia this year, that’s one every three minutes.

1 in 6 people over the age of 80 have dementia.

70 per cent of people in care homes have dementia or severe memory problems.

There are over 40,000 people under 65 with dementia in the UK.

More than 25,000 people from black, Asian and minority ethnic groups in the UK are affected.

How much does it cost?

Two thirds of the cost of dementia is paid by people with dementia and their families.

Unpaid carers supporting someone with dementia save the economy £11 billion a year.

Dementia is one of the main causes of disability later in life, ahead of cancer, cardiovascular disease and stroke. As a country we spend much less on dementia than on these other conditions.

How does the UK compare to other countries?

There are an estimated 46.8 million people living with dementia and the numbers affected will double every 20 years, rising to 115.4 million in 2050.

Another 7.7 million people will develop dementia around the world every year.

What about treatments and research?

There is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease or any other type of dementia. Delaying the onset of dementia by five years would halve the number of deaths from the condition, saving 30,000 lives a year.

Dementia research is desperately underfunded. For every person living with dementia, the annual cost to the UK economy is over £30,000 and yet only £90 is spent on dementia research each year.

There are not enough researchers and clinicians joining the fight against dementia. Five times fewer researchers choose to work on dementia than on cancer.

Alzheimer’s Society is committed to spending at least £150 million over the next decade on dementia research to improve care for people today and find a cure for tomorrow. This includes £50 million to develop the UK’s first dedicated Dementia Research Institute.

The reason I wanted to highlight these stats was just to reaffirm how important every penny we raised is – so once again THANK YOU BAKERS AND BUN-EATERS!!!

Written by Sally Hutchinson

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